Tag Archives: basketball

Big first half gives Missouri a 76-71 win over Elon

Missouri’s Keith Shamburger (14, hidden) draws a key foul on Elon’s Tony Sabato (15, hidden) as Missouri’s Montaque Gill-Caesar (13) and Johnathan Williams III (3 in white, hidden) and Elon’s Kevin Blake (11), Ryan Winters (32) and Tanner Samson (3 in red, hidden) look on.

Missouri’s Keith Shamburger (14, hidden) draws a key foul on Elon’s Tony Sabato (15, hidden) as Missouri’s Montaque Gill-Caesar (13) and Johnathan Williams III (3 in white, hidden) and Elon’s Kevin Blake (11), Ryan Winters (32) and Tanner Samson (3 in red, hidden) look on.

Story By Tim Leible, KBIA Sports
Photos by Greg Dailey, KBIA Sports

The Missouri Tigers had their best first half of the season en route to a 76-71 win over Elon. Missouri held a 46-27 lead at the half and shot lights out. As a team, they made 59.1 percent of their first-half shot attempts and went 6-9 from behind the arc.

On the other hand, Elon had a horrific first half. Despite being a team known for their offense, Elon shot only 24.2 percent from the field in the first half. The Missouri

defense forced poor shot attempts all half, leading Elon to only make eight baskets.

The second half, however, was almost detrimental to the Tigers.

Read more of this post

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Clark suspended indefinitely; Tigers win close game with SEMO 65-61

Montaque Gill-Caesar brings the ball up in transition in the second half against Southeast Missouri on Tuesday, Dec. 2, 2014. Gill-Caesar had a huge second half for the Tigers, scoring 13 of his 15 points after halftime.

Montaque Gill-Caesar brings the ball up in transition in the second half against Southeast Missouri on Tuesday, Dec. 2, 2014. Gill-Caesar had a huge second half for the Tigers, scoring 13 of his 15 points after halftime.

By Tim Leible, KBIA Sports

The Tigers were without starting point guard Wes Clark Tuesday night, but still were able to sneak away with a victory over Southeastern Missouri 65-61.

Anderson said Clark has been suspended indefinitely for violating team guidelines, but refused to comment further.

In Clark’s absence, Keith Shamburger had an expanded role and he took advantage.

In 39 minutes, he scored 11 points. Efficiency was Read more of this post

What To Expect When the Tigers Visit Athens

By: Cody Mroczka

COLUMBIA – The Missouri men’s basketball team will travel to Athens, GA on Tuesday to play the Georgia Bulldogs.

Both Missouri (19-8, 7-7 Southeastern Conference) and Georgia (15-11, 9-5 SEC) were in action on Saturday with the Tigers losing to Alabama and the Bulldogs defeating South Carolina.

Before heading to Georgia on Monday, Missouri coach Frank Haith and guard Earnest Ross met with media members to discuss the upcoming matchup. (Length: 2:27)

Thinking Out Loud, Saturday Sports: Remembering Kent Heitholt

Darren Hellwege logoThe news last week of the release of Ryan Ferguson brought back memories of the horrible crime that took the life of Columbia Tribune sports editor Kent Heitholt in 2001. I talk with current Sports editor Joe Walljasper about Heitholt, his friend and boss. You’ll hear from Southern Illinois basketball coach Barry Hinson in a post game interview that is nothing short of hysterical. And I start it all off with a look back over a 3-0 start to women’s basketball at Mizzou.

Length: 51:49

Darren Hellwege is a member of the Football Writers Association of America and the United States Basketball Writers Association.

Mizzou’s season comes to an end in WNIT opener at home

By Elaine Stockdale

The Mizzou Tigers lose 60-58 to Eastern Illinois in the first round of the WNIT at Mizzou Arena Wednesday, March 20, 2013.

The Mizzou Tigers lose 60-58 to Eastern Illinois in the first round of the WNIT at Mizzou Arena Wednesday, March 20, 2013.

With nine seconds left in the game, the Missouri Tigers chance to extend its first postseason appearance since the 2006-07’ Women’s National Invitation Tournament came to a close.

After a time out taken by the Tigers with ten seconds remaining in the game, Missouri had one last possession to tie or win the game. But the Tigers failed to capitalize in front of a 1,551 crowd, falling 60-58 to Eastern Illinois at Mizzou Arena Wednesday night.

With 19 seconds left, Eastern Illinois’ Ta’Kenya Nixon made a shot that put the Panthers two points ahead of Missouri – who held the lead over the Panthers for most of the second half. The Panthers went on an 8-0 run in the last six minutes of the game, bringing the Tigers lead down and closing the gates on Missouri’s season.

Junior Bri Kulas and senior Sydney Crafton were stand outs for the Tigers – each finishing with the highest points scored for Missouri with 12. Kulas also contributed seven rebounds, Crafton with three.

The Tigers shot 25 – 62 from the field and 7 for 20 on 3-pointers. The Tigers finished with 16 assists and 35 rebounds while the Panthers had seven assists and 29 rebounds.

Missouri ended its season at 17 – 15. Wednesday’s loss made it five straight postseason losses for the Tigers.

“Tonight wasn’t our night,” Missouri coach Robin Pingeton said. “I hate to think we were tight, but in the first half we did play a bit panicky and a bit rushed, we weren’t as poised as I would have liked us to be.”

Eastern Illinois (20-11)  were regular season champions in the Ohio Valley conference.

“I felt like we had our chances there at the end, I felt like Illinois came in like a veteran team and really had us on our heels,” Pingeton said. “They just came in and took it, there’s a reason they’ve had such a solid year.”

Missouri center Liz Smith managed nine points and eight rebounds for the game, guard Kyley Simmons contributed six points and two rebounds.

Nixon finished with a game high of 27 points, five steals and three rebounds.

“Nixon’s a special player, we didn’t have an answer for her tonight,” Pingeton said.

Mizzou rolls by Texas A&M in first round of SEC Tournament

By Matt Fairburn

Prior to the Southeastern Conference Tournament in Nashville, Tenn., Missouri forward Alex Oriakhi had some advice for his team from his 2009 national championship run with Connecticut. Teams that make it in March are willing to fight, Oriakhi said on Monday.

That is what Missouri (23-9) did in Thursday night’s 62-50 win over Texas A&M (18-15) on Thursday night in the opening round of the SEC Tournament.

Despite the Aggies slowing down the pace, limiting itself to 10 turnovers and playing its usual physical brand of basketball, the Tigers never lost control of the game and held the lead from start to finish.

Even in a low-scoring affair, Texas A&M couldn’t prevent Missouri from scoring in bunches. A 10-0 run in the first half put the Tigers up 26-13, and an 8-0 run midway through the second half put the game out of reach at 45-26.

While Missouri led for much of the night, the physical play continued throughout the game. The slow speed of the game and physicality of Texas A&M’s defense did not bode well for Missouri guard Phil Pressey. Pressey missed his only shot attempt and finished the game with two points and six assists.

Oriakhi finished the game with 13 points and 10 rebounds; both team highs for the Tigers.

The win allows the sixth-seeded Missouri to advance to the quarterfinals to take on the No. 3 seed Ole Miss. The Tigers and Rebels split the season series this year. Missouri lost to Ole Miss by 15 points on the road but managed a 19-point victory when the two teams met at Mizzou Arena.

Friday night’s game is scheduled to tip off at 9 p.m. Central time at Bridgestone Arena in Nashville.

Mizzou ready for SEC opener against Alabama 


By the Associated Press

COLUMBIA, Mo. — Missouri is so well-tested that its first-ever SEC game should not cause any extra anxiety.

A 2-point decision over Bucknell, an overtime loss at UCLA and a neutral-site victory over Illinois have all helped the 10th-ranked Tigers (11-2) prepare for Tuesday night’s game against Alabama (8-5).

They trailed at halftime and got outrebounded for the first time all season in the close call against Bucknell on Saturday before winning their 73rd consecutive non-conference home game, a feat stretching to the 2005-06 opener. Coach Frank Haith is counting on such tests to toughen the roster now that the competition figures to step up on a consistent basis, even if the opening matchup appears a bit lopsided.

Alabama had lost five of six overall before beating Oakland 65-45 on Saturday to snap a three-game home losing streak.

“I love where we’re at. I love our team; I love our attitude and our toughness,” Haith said. “You hear these guys talk about toughness and it is something that we emphasize.”

The unquestioned leader has been the lone returning starter.

Junior point guard Phil Pressey had a career-high 26 points against Bucknell after getting 19 points and a school-record 19 assists at UCLA. Pressey has 35 assists the last three games and has 433 for his career, tied for third on the school career list with Larry Drew, a former NBA star and the current Atlanta Hawks coach. He’s 64 assists shy of Anthony Peeler’s school record.

“Watching all the tape, the DVDs of him playing, if I didn’t have to prepare to play against him, it would have been a treat,” Bucknell coach Dave Paulsen said. “He’s the best passing point guard that I’ve coached against since I’ve been at Bucknell.”

Missouri had just two turnovers in the second half, and eight overall.

Laurence Bowers, back all the way from knee surgery that sidelined him all season, also had a strong game with 16 points and eight rebounds. Bowers has scored in double figures eight straight games and has 56 points with 27 rebounds the last three.

“Those three games were a good challenge for us. I thought we handled them well,” Bowers said. “We just have to continue to get better.”

After the Bucknell game, Haith reminded players of that.

“You get in league play, it’s a little different,” Haith said. “Kentucky, Alabama, you see some young teams I think that will start to play better.

“And that’s my focus in telling our team that we’ve got to be ready to play every time we lace them up.”

Fan interest is booming heading into SEC play with attendance of 13,856, while more than 1,000 shy of capacity, more than 3,000 better than the previous best during an 8-0 start at home. The Mizzou Arena is sold out for two-thirds of the conference games, with tickets remaining for Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina.

Thinking Out Loud: Michelle Hudyn and JJ Stankevitz

Darren Hellwege logoJan. 5, 2013
This week Darren Hellwege talks Missouri women’s basketball with Michelle Hudyn and NCAA championship football with J.J. Stankevitz. Hudyn is a 6-foot-2-inch freshman from Kitchener, Ontario, Canada and Stankevitz is an MU journalism graduate who covers Notre Dame for CSNChicago.com.
Length: 59:00

You can listen to Darren’s show Saturdays at 6 a.m. on KBIA FM 91.3.

Eye comes up big as Mizzou downs Missouri State, 91-77

Story and photos by Kaysie Moore

Sophomore guard Morgan Eye (30) maneuvers around Missouri State’s Kenzie Williams (4). Eye continued her 3-point streak on Thursday, sinking five 3-pointers and leading Missouri with 21 points.

Sophomore guard Morgan Eye (30) maneuvers around Missouri State’s Kenzie Williams (4). Eye continued her 3-point streak on Thursday, sinking five 3-pointers and leading Missouri with 21 points.

For the second time this week, Missouri’s sophomore guard Morgan Eye displayed her stellar shooting touch.

Three days after breaking the Missouri school record for 3-pointers made (8), Eye went 5-for-11 from behind the arc and paced the Tigers with 21 points as Missouri defeated in-state foe Missouri State, 91-77.

Liz Smith also enjoyed a big night for Missouri. The senior center set a new career high in points with 14, joining teammates Eye, Bri Kulas, Lianna Doty and Sydney Crafton in double digits on the night.

The Tigers stayed undefeated at Mizzou Arena for the season and improved to 7-2, marking their sixth win at home in as many tries.

Missouri will look to keep rolling on a quick turnaround in its schedule, as the Tigers host Arkansas-Pine Bluff on Saturday, Dec. 8 and 5:30 p.m. at Mizzou Arena.

Missouri coach Robin Pingeton talks to Bri Kulas (13) Kyley Simmons (15) and Morgan Eye on the bench during Thursday's game.

Missouri coach Robin Pingeton talks to Bri Kulas (13) Kyley Simmons (15) and Morgan Eye on the bench during Thursday’s game.

Sophomore guard Kyley Simmons (15) jumps to block a pass from Missouri State's Whitney Edie (1). Simmons notched five assists in 27 minutes on the floor.

Sophomore guard Kyley Simmons (15) jumps to block a pass from Missouri State’s Whitney Edie (1). Simmons notched five assists in 27 minutes on the floor.

Kyley Simmons, left, and other teammates help junior forward Bri Kulas off the floor after being fouled by Missouri State's Whitney Edie. Kulas contributed 17 points for Missouri.

Kyley Simmons, left, and other teammates help junior forward Bri Kulas off the floor after being fouled by Missouri State’s Whitney Edie. Kulas contributed 17 points for Missouri.

Sophomore guard Bree Fowler (3) high fives her teammates during a break in the action on Thursday night. The Tigers improved to 7-2.

Sophomore guard Bree Fowler (3) high fives her teammates during a break in the action on Thursday night. The Tigers improved to 7-2.

Players from both teams struggle for possession of the ball, including senior guard Sydney Crafton (21). Crafton scored 14 points, grabbed 10 rebounds and had four assists.

Players from both teams struggle for possession of the ball, including senior guard Sydney Crafton (21). Crafton scored 14 points, grabbed 10 rebounds and had four assists.

Lianna Doty (1) tries to steal the ball from Missouri State player Mikala McGhee. The Tigers beat the Bears, 91-77, with Doty contributing 14 points and six assists.

Lianna Doty (1) tries to steal the ball from Missouri State player Mikala McGhee. The Tigers beat the Bears, 91-77, with Doty contributing 14 points and six assists.

NCAA deregulates texts and calls to basketball recruits 


By Luke Meredith
The Associated Press

Mike Alden

Coaches can now pick up their smartphones without trepidation.

Starting Friday, Division I men’s basketball coaches will be able to send unlimited texts and make unlimited calls to recruits who have wrapped up their sophomore year of high school. The NCAA will also allow coaches to send private messages to prospective players through social media sites like Facebook and Twitter.

It all means that sending a recruit an LOL (laugh out loud) will no longer get you a TTYL (talk to you later) from the NCAA.

The NCAA is allowing coaches to text, tweet and talk to their hearts’ content because, as Missouri athletic director Mike Alden put it, the organization “recognized the evolving nature of communication with students.”

In essence, coaches can finally get with the times without getting into trouble.

“I really believe it will help. I’m excited about it. And I think it’s going to be good, more so than the texts, just the ability to call and making sure to have that direct verbal communication,” Memphis coach Josh Pastner said.

The new rule was adopted by the Division I Board of Directors last October after being recommended by its leadership council. The NCAA realized that coaches were having a tougher time than ever building relationships with recruits who already know their way around social media and then some.

What was even more worrisome was that while coaches had their thumbs tied behind their backs, third parties were using new technology to get to recruits more easily than ever.

“Now instead of going around people to get to the kid or the parents, you can call them directly. I think that’s a very valid point as to why they made the rule change,” first-year Illinois coach John Groce said.

But just because a coach can call and text a kid at will doesn’t mean he should.

Knowing when to contact a recruit and when to back off could be the tricky side of this new policy.

Creighton coach Greg McDermott has a unique perspective on the matter, having seen recruiting from the side of a coach at Northern Iowa, Iowa State and Creighton and as the father of current Jays star Doug McDermott.

Greg McDermott said that the main objective for his staff is to get to know each recruit and their family inside and out. Some will undoubtedly get a kick out of all the extra attention, while others will be turned off by it.

“I think I’m probably still on the fence,” McDermott said of the new rules. “It can be a disruptive process if you allow it to become that. So I think it’s going to become really important for our staff to make sure we do our due diligence in researching each individual and each family.”

With these new guidelines, the NCAA has essentially legalized the activity that got former Oklahoma and Indiana coach Kelvin Sampson bounced from the college game a few years back. But all coaches have had to walk a tightrope of monitoring phone calls made by themselves and their staff to recruits, and the new rules should help them breathe easier.

“You know, honestly I think it’s just too hard to keep track of,” West Virginia coach Bob Huggins said. “If you can’t legislate it, if you can’t enforce it then you probably ought to just go ahead and make it legal. I think that’s kind of what happened with Prohibition.”

There could also be an unexpected benefit from allowing more contact between coaches and recruits.

It will be easier for everyone to know the level of interest – say, a BFF (best friends forever), a BFFN (best friends for now) or it’s C-YA time.

“I think it’s a win-win for everybody,” Minnesota coach Tubby Smith said. “Kids, they all have cellphones where they can identify who’s calling. They can pick up the phone or not. That gives you an indication about where you stand.”

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AP Sports Writers Dave Campbell in Minneapolis, Teresa Walker in Memphis, Tenn., and David Mercer in Champaign, Ill., contributed to this report.

 

 

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press.